Monitor w/Alarms For Medical Freezer Temps

High-Quality Data Loggers Protect Prescription Medicines

RTR-502

CHESTERLAND OH, USA  –  CAS DataLoggers recently provided the temperature monitoring and alarming solution for a nationwide security company with a pharmacy client who required additional alarming for their 3 medical refrigerators.

These storage units contained extremely temperature-sensitive prescription medicine such as amoxicillin which required continual monitoring at a high level of accuracy, and manual recordings had proved to be inaccurate and time-consuming.

The security company installed a T&D RTR-500NW Wireless Data Logger Network Base Station adjacent to the alarm panel and connected them.  Three T&D RTR-502 Wireless Temperature Data Loggers were then installed atop the storage units, with each logger’s external temperature sensor placed inside the refrigerators.

The dataloggers measured each refrigerator’s temperature in both Celcius and Fahrenheit at a -60 °C to 155 °C range and a precise 0.1 °C measurement display resolution.

Current readings were clearly shown on their LCD displays, and the data loggers also came with options for screw terminals or wall mounts.

When the temperature loggers went into alarm state, the base station closed its digital contact, thus alerting the security system via the control panel connection. Personnel would instantly know that there was a problem with the equipment under monitoring and could quickly respond to the problem, travel to the pharmacy outside business hours, or alert a maintenance crew to resolve the problem.

Now the pharmacy can collect all the temperature data from the loggers remotely via USB, GSM technology, LAN and handheld data collectors. The pharmacy also set up the base station to automatically download the data via wireless communication and then send that data via network to a designated e-mail address, and the loggers also continually monitored the fridges for warnings and sent warning reports across the network via email.

Users could also choose to send data to an FTP folder or T&D’s own Web Storage server. Wireless communication between the temperature recorders ranged to about 500 ft (150 meters), and personnel could expand the wireless communication range even further by registering an RTR-500 as a Repeater.

Each data logger’s memory capacity of 16,000 readings meant that the pharmacy could set each one to record every second and still log four and a half hours of data. Personnel used a 30 minute recording interval to keep logging continuously for 333 days.

The data loggers had a battery life of about 10 months and could be upgraded to last for about 4 years of use.

As a result of installing the wireless temperature dataloggers and network base station, the pharmacy experienced an increase in its response times when refrigerators failed or temperatures otherwise suddenly went out of specification.

Additionally, the refrigerators’ new alarm capability warned personnel when doors had been left open and when excessive opening had raised the temperature too quickly.

Together, these monitoring and alarming features helped prevent unnecessary loss of inventory and lengthy resupply times due to negligence.

For more information on the T&D RTR-502 Wireless Temperature Data Logger, the T&D RTR-500 NW Wireless Data Logger Network Base Station, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:

CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland OH 44026 USA

Toll Free: 800-9-LOGGER (800-956-4437)
Phone: +1 440-729-2570
Fax” +1 440-729-2586
Information and Sales: sales@dataloggerinc.com
Website: www.DataLoggerInc.com


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