IR Sensor Successfully Monitors the Heat – Controls Quality at Ottawa Fiber

According to the App note on the Raytek website with the customer using the Marathon FA1G sensor, a fiber optic infrared thermometer for measuring glass temperatures from 750 to 1675 ??C (1382 to 3047 ??F), from Raytek.

InfraredPointSensors_MarathonSeries_MarathonFA
MarathonSeries: MarathonFA

No question about it, Stan Banaszkiewicz can take the heat. In fact, it’s his job, and every where he goes-it’s hot.

Banaszkiewicz is Plant Engineer at Ottawa Fiber, a Canadian manufacturer of fiberglass insulation for home, industrial, and commercial use. To produce that insulation, it’s necessary to melt glass-80 percent of it recycled. The process requires temperatures ranging from 900 ??C (1652 ??F) to as high as 1,200 ??C (2192 ??F).

Before melting, ingredients are added and the molten glass flows from the furnace to the forehearth and finally into the bushing. Eventually, the molten glass drops down though an orifice in the channel to a centrifugal “spinner.” The glass is forced through the spinner’s tiny holes and comes out as glass fiber.

But the heat is still on and this complex process isn’t over yet. In the next step, the glass fiber is formed and collected on a conveyer where polymers are added to keep it together. From there, it goes to the curing oven where the additives harden. It then gets cut and sliced, Banaszkiewicz explained…

…The need to measure the temperatures in the glass fiber manufacturing process led Banaszkiewicz to the Marathon FA1G sensor, a fiber optic infrared thermometer for measuring glass temperatures from 750 to 1675 ??C (1382 to 3047 ??F), from Raytek. With applications ranging from measuring the molten glass in the forehearth to measuring the packing material temperature for optimum regenerator airflow control, the FA1G thermometer was a fit with Ottawa Fiber’s needs.

Read the full applications story by Kate McGuire on the Raytek website at: www.raytek.com/Raytek/en-r0/NewsAndEvents/OtherResources/SuccessStories/FA1G+at+Ottawa+Fiber.htm