These U.S. Cities Are Most Vulnerable to Major Coastal Flooding and Sea Level Rise

Research Report by Climate Central

Online  —  In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy took a sharp left turn into the coasts of New Jersey and New York, leading to 157 deaths, 51 square miles of flooding in New York City alone, and an estimated $50+ billion in damage (Bloomberg 2013; Kemp and Horton 2013).

The name “Sandy” was retired, but risks to coastal cities for Sandy-like flooding remain. On the five-year anniversary of the storm, Climate Central has ranked the U.S. cities most vulnerable to major coastal floods using three different metrics:

Read more These U.S. Cities Are Most Vulnerable to Major Coastal Flooding and Sea Level Rise

Alaska Towns At Risk from Rising Seas Sound Alarm

By Oliver Milman, The Guardian

Guardian_sealevelrise_Alaska_shishmaref
Shismaref, a village in Alaska that voted to relocate to the mainland in the face of sea level rise. Credit: Bering Land Bridge National Park/flickr

Online — The U.S. government’s withdrawal from dealing with, or even acknowledging, climate change may have provoked widespread opprobrium, but for Alaskan communities at risk of toppling into the sea, the risks are rather more personal.

The Trump administration has moved to dismantle climate adaptation programs including the Denali Commission, an Anchorage-based agency that is crafting a plan to safeguard or relocate dozens of towns at risk from rising sea levels, storms and the winnowing away of sea ice.

Federal assistance for these towns has been ponderous but could now grind to a halt, with even those working on the issue seemingly targeted by the administration.

In July, Joel Clement, an interior department official who worked with Alaskan communities on climate adaptation, claimed he had been moved to a completely unrelated position because of the administration’s ideological hostility to the issue. Read more Alaska Towns At Risk from Rising Seas Sound Alarm

Despite Trump, states keep getting more energy-efficient.

Most-improved states Idaho, Florida, and Virginia

grist-logo-headerOnline  —  An annual assessment of energy-efficiency standards shows that states around the country are pushing forward programs to reduce pollution and save people money, even as the Trump administration works to roll back these sorts of programs at the federal level.

The report, from the nonprofit American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, shows progress in both blue and red states.

While liberal-minded states tend to invest more in energy efficiency — Massachusetts, California, and Rhode Island got top marks — the efforts underway defy the normal partisan spectrum. Read more Despite Trump, states keep getting more energy-efficient.

More Hot Days Are Coming With Climate Change. Our Choices Will Decide How Many

Research Report by Climate Central

Summer still has a month to go, but extreme heat has been a major story line through June and July. Sweltering temperatures have grounded planes, sparked wildfires and set records from coast-to-coast.

For example, Phoenix has averaged less than one day above 115 °F a year over the past 20 years.

If the rate of global greenhouse gas emissions continues on its current trajectory, Phoenix may see as many as 60 days above 115 °F each year by the end of the century (and a staggering 163 days above 100 °F). Read more More Hot Days Are Coming With Climate Change. Our Choices Will Decide How Many