AirDat’s weather forecasts from…

More than an airborne sensor network

tamdar

Morrisville, NC, USA –?? AirDat cooperates with airlines to install its sensors and satellite communication equipment on their aircraft; atmospheric data is continuously collected and transmitted as the aircraft go about their scheduled routes.

The airborne sensor network is managed remotely from AirDat’s operations center. Observations are streamed in real time to AirDat where they pass through QA and formatting processes and are assimilated into specialized atmospheric models running on AirDat’s high-speed computing clusters.

TAMDAR (Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting) is a new, high-resolution atmospheric observing system.

The TAMDAR system comprises a patented multi-function atmospheric sensor installed on commercial scheduled aircraft, a near real time satellite data communication system, and AirDat\’s ground-based data processing and distribution systems.

High-resolution continuous TAMDAR observations fill in the gaps in conventional atmospheric data to create more accurate weather forecasts.

TAMDAR sensors are installed on commercial airliners, and transmit atmospheric observations continuously as the aircraft climbs, cruises and descends, providing a stream of atmospheric data via a low-latency global satellite network.

TAMDAR observations are typically received, processed and available for distribution or assimilation into AirDat’s models or other applications in less than 60 seconds from the time of the observation.

The sensor requires no crew involvement; it operates automatically and sampling rates and calibration constants can be adjusted by remote command from AirDat’s operations center.

Atmospheric measurements performed by the TAMDAR sensor include:
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#???? Location,time, and altitude from built-in GPS

The TAMDAR sensor was designed to requirements defined by NASA, NOAA/FSL, and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

The data output format meets the unique needs of TAMDAR, while maintaining compatibility with US ACARS and international AMDAR standards. Independently reviewed flight tests have confirmed the accuracy of the TAMDAR observations.

How frequently are TAMDAR measurements taken?
TAMDAR observations are based on pressure, rather than time, intervals during the ascent and descent phases. Time defaults are provided for portions of the flight when the aircraft is not significantly ascending or descending. All intervals and defaults are remotely adjustable from the data center.

When operating under typical high-resolution settings, ascent and descent observations are made at 10 hPa (300 feet) pressure intervals up to 200 hPa (6000 feet) above ground level. Observations more than 200 hPa (6000 feet) above ground level are made at 25 hPa intervals.

If an observation has not been made below 20,000 feet (465 hPa) for three minutes, then an observation is triggered by time default; if an observation has not been made above 20,000 feet (465 hPa) for seven minutes, then an observation is triggered by time default.

With a continuous stream of observations, TAMDAR provides much higher resolution spatial and temporal distribution of observations than the weather balloon network, and a more complete data set than ACARS (MDCRS). It delivers thousands of daily observations from locations and at times not available from any other observing system.

TAMDAR observations include not only temperature, pressure, and winds aloft measurements, but also humidity, icing, and turbulence. Each data point includes a GPS time/date/position/attitude stamp.

The accuracy of TAMDAR observations has been verified against weather balloons and aircraft test instrumentation.

Documented case studies and statistical analyses show that the inclusion of TAMDAR data yields dramatic improvements in the accuracy of forecast models, particularly in dynamic atmospheric conditions.

AirDat’s TAMDAR system has been in continuous operation on regional airliners since December 2004.

AirDat has over 400 aircraft under contract for TAMDAR, providing coverage of the continental United States and Alaska. Agreements for an additional 500+ aircraft are under discussion.

AirDat cooperates with airlines to install its sensors and satellite communication equipment on their aircraft; atmospheric data is continuously collected and transmitted as the aircraft go about their scheduled routes. The airborne sensor network is managed remotely from AirDat’s operations center. Observations are streamed in real time to AirDat where they pass through QA and formatting processes and are assimilated into specialized atmospheric models running on AirDat’s high-speed computing clusters.

AirDat’s capabilities include atmospheric modeling and application development, electronic design and product development, software systems development, and network design, management and data center services.

About AirDat

AirDat delivers improved atmospheric knowledge tailored to mitigate weather risk to your business. This is accomplished through more accurate weather forecasts and analysis derived from AirDat’s proprietary atmospheric data; this unique data set is made possible by AirDat’s network of patented airborne sensors called TAMDAR (Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting), which provide a continuous stream of real time observations filling in the large temporal and geographic gaps between weather balloon soundings.

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